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Sentence Opener Series #3: Top Ten Sentence Openers

Why should we vary our sentence openers? Well, if we don’t, we may sound like this:

SENTENCE OPENER SERIESI will write five sentences.

They will have five words.

The sentences sound the same.

I should vary their lengths.

That would sound much better.

Since each sentence contains the same number of words and begins with the same subject opener, it sounds redundant. Varying your sentence lengths and openers adds musicality and interest to your writing. Here are some ways to transform a simple sentence about my lazy cat:

 

#1 – Subject

Most sentences, like this one, begin with a subject.

Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#2 – Adverb

Use a flexional adverb, also known as an -ly word, to start a simple sentence. Here’s a list of flexional adverbs.

Frequently, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#3 – Prepositional Phrase

Add a prepositional phrase to the beginning of a sentence. Here’s a list of prepositions.

In the warm rays of the sun, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#4 – Adverb Clause

Begin a dependent clause with an adverb. Abbreviated as as www.asia.wub, most clauses begin with the following adverbs: when, where, while, as, since, if, although, whereas, unless, and because.

Because she plays at night, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#5 – Infinitive Phrase

An infinitive is “to plus a verb,” and when used in a phrase, it provides another sentence opener.

To obtain boundless energy for the night, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

# 6 – Present Participle

A present participle is “a verb plus -ing.”

Playing all night, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#7- Past Participle

A past participle is “a verb plus -ed.”

Exhausted from a night of mischief, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

# 8 – Dual

A dual opener combines two parallel grammatical components, such as two present participles.

Playing and meowing all night, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#9 – Triple

A triple opener combines three parallel grammatical components, such as three present participles.

Playing, meowing, and running all night, Lucy sleeps all day.

 

#10 – Short Sentence

When used sparingly, a sentence of 2-5 words can add emphasis.

Lucy sleeps.

 

Here’s the link to TOP TEN SENTENCE OPENERS.

TOP TEN SENTENCE OPENERS

While I wrote this blog post, Lucy slept in a chair, got up, turned around, and slept some more. Like Lucy, did the topic of sentence openers have a soporific effect on you? (Please do not answer that question in the comment section.)

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Author:

I'm an author of teen fiction, devotionals, and homeschooling curriculum.

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